wxWidgets, C++ libraries and C++11

Building wxWidgets on OS X targeting libc++

It seems right to put this at the top of the post for easy access (probably for my own reference).

To get a configuration of wxWidgets (I am using version 3.0.0) which will use the libc++ as the standard library implementation, the following command line works (using Apple LLVM version 5.0 clang-500.2.79):


../configure --disable-shared --enable-unicode --with-cocoa --with-macosx-version-min=10.7 --with-macosx-sdk=/Developer/SDKs/MacOSX10.7.sdk CXXFLAGS="-std=c++0x -stdlib=libc++" CPPFLAGS="-stdlib=libc++" LIBS=-lc++

-std=c++0x (I know, this is deprecated syntax) tells the compiler that we want C++11 features.
-stdlib=libc++ tells the compiler we want to use the libc++ standard library implementation (rather than the libstdc++ implementation.

This will produce a static, unicode build of wxWidgets without debug information. The flags will not work with --with-macosx-version-min set to anything less than 10.7 because -stdlib=libc++ requires this as a minimum.

Why build wxWidgets on OS X targeting libc++

OS X currently ships with two C++ libraries, libstdc++ and libc++. libc++ is reasonably new and completely supports C++11. libstdc++ (on OS X anyway) is very old and only supports a subset of C++03. Unless you specify otherwise, building an application with clang will produce object code which expects to link against libstdc++ targeting the C++98 standard. If you are building C++11 code and only add -std=c++0x to your compiler arguments, your application may fail to compile because the standard library might not have all of the features which you require. In short, if you require C++11 support on OS X, you probably want to migrate over to libc++ for your standard library.

If you build a static library with C++98 targeting libstdc++ and try to link it against an application targeting libc++, you are probably going to get errors looking something like (for wxWidgets anyway):


Undefined symbols for architecture x86_64:
"std::basic_string, std::allocator >::find_last_of(wchar_t const*, unsigned long, unsigned long) const", referenced from:
wxFileName::SplitPath(wxString const&, wxString*, wxString*, wxString*, wxString*, bool*, wxPathFormat) in libwx_baseu-3.0.a(baselib_filename.o)
"std::basic_string, std::allocator >::find_first_of(wchar_t const*, unsigned long, unsigned long) const", referenced from:
wxLocale::GetSystemLanguage() in libwx_baseu-3.0.a(baselib_intl.o)
wxFileName::SplitVolume(wxString const&, wxString*, wxString*, wxPathFormat) in libwx_baseu-3.0.a(baselib_filename.o)
wxRegExImpl::Replace(wxString*, wxString const&, unsigned long) const in libwx_baseu-3.0.a(baselib_regex.o)
wxString::find_first_of(char const*, unsigned long) const in libwx_baseu-3.0.a(baselib_mimecmn.o)
wxString::find_first_of(char const*, unsigned long) const in libwx_osx_cocoau_core-3.0.a(corelib_osx_cocoa_button.o)

... which will continue for several hundred lines.

This is because libstdc++ and libc++ are not fully ABI compatible. When your libc++ application tries to link against a library expecting libstdc++, you are going to have major unresolved symbol issues unless you use a very minimal subset of C++11. Bugger.

Edit: I just found this excellent post Marshall's C++ Musings - Clang and standard libraries on Mac OS X which is very relevant to the topic.

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